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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded on the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestantism. by the 20th century, catholics and jews mayed an important role, the -- played an important role, even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, common law, which which posits that god has given or that law is given from god to the people, and it bubbles upward to the rulers. this gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common law stands in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common law, but by the 20th century, both had nonetheless abandoned it. therefor, by the end of world war or ii when -- world war ii when europe unloaded its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. thus, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant rel
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded in the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestant. by the 20th century catholic, jewish but important role a culture 190000 so fundamentally protestant and even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, ma, which causes the last given from god to defeat all in bubbles upward to the rulers. kids says the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to peer, my stands in stark opposition to every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law and which the law. germany and england had come them off for a while but by the 20 century, both have more or less abandoned it, germany more so than england. their further the end of world war ii, when europe unloaded, however unwillingly its colony, those colonies themselves to find and print process of the law. thus the first of pillars taken together means that a christian, protestant religion influence and shape everything about ameri
another mormon date, so there's lds singles.com. for christians the majority religion in the u.s., there's christian mingle. you probably have seen the commercials. even muslims are on the hunt for a date. muslima.com is one of the more popular sites. finding a partner of the same faith is important to many jewish-americans, so they use j date and the site talks about its results. >> different sides of the country. >> here we are madly in love with two kids later, and if it wasn't for j date, we never would have met. >> going on j-date led to this amazing life that i have. >> i knew by the second date. >> i know you heard a baby. you thought is that baby somewhere? yes, her name is willa. she's here with her parents, jason and melissa. they met on j-date, married last year, had the baby, willa. hello, willa. thank you for joining us this morning. both of you, thank you. tell us about the importance of finding a date -- good morning. about finding love and the importance of religion in finding that. >> i grew nup a very traditional jewish household, and it was very important to me to pass
. michael kors 6. select comfort 7. true religion 8. vera bradley and, 9. birks & mayors in the ipo market this week, paper company boise cascade hopes to raise up to $200 million in its ipo. the public offering may have traders watching office max. shares of office max spiked 27% on friday due to the large stake it holds in boise cascade. meanwhile, wi-fi company ruckus wireless had a shaky first day in the markets. the stock fell 4% following its ipo. and, watch for alon usa partners, which hits the market this week. the oil refinery company is pricing in between 19 and 21 dollars. if your flock plans on eating an organic, free-range, specially- fed bird, here's one. this big bird could set you back $335. the heritage turkey farm in virginia is reporting brisk sales of the 20-pound birds. it may sound like they were raised at the waldorf, but the birds are really just given sufficient space and nutritous feed. some chefs say the superior taste simply doesn't compare to super-market brands, while other chefs say the key to the best tasting bird is how you prepare it. nintendo is already s
you come from, no matter what religion you practice. the right of people to live without the threat that their families may be harmed simply because of who they are or where they come from. only the people of this country can define your union, can define what it means to be a citizen of this country. but i have confidence that, as you do that, you can draw on the diversity as a strength and not a weakness. your country will be stronger because of many different cultures. but you have to seize that opportunity. you have to recognize that strength. i say this because my own country and my own life have taught me the power of diversity. the united states of america is a nation of christians and jews and muslims and buddhists and hindus and nonbelievers. our story is shaped by every language, enriched by every culture. we have people from every corner of the word. we have tasted the bitterness of civil war and segregation. but our history shows us that hatred in the human heart can recede. that the lines between racism and tribes can fade away. and what's left is a simple truth, out of
appreciated talking about religion and i do enjoy the space. we talk about where we don't necessarily have to talk about -- we don't have to defend ourselves against old understandings of what a woman is in the bible. the reality is that we are in a room full of conservative people, we wouldn't go very many minutes in a conversation of women and gender without talking about this. i'm wondering when progressives will meet at conversation. not only does talking about that, but maybe it's not happening and those that actually are talking to it. i think that that is, you know, we got by with this election and not feeling overcome by large religious organizations that have a lot of money, but they are also the ones going right now. those who define religious freedom and in four years from now, i think that is something that we will really need. so when are we going to talk about how to meet at conversation? >> yes, i think that is a really important point. i do believe that for us, working in the lbgt community, we have been dealing with this a lot. all of the laws that are getting past have so
. i do not think that is religion specific. i think it is across the board. his relationship with israel, the muslim world. host: this is a financial times editorial today. general petraeus has been the mastermind behind using drugs to go after al qaeda in the horn of africa. but has been the world reaction to this kind of military strategy? guest: it's a controversial strategy, no question. the administration has doubled down on the use of drones. there are significantly more than a river were then in the bush administration. there is clearly rationale for some of this, but there are some issues about executive privilege in making some of these decisions. i do not think petraeus is the only person who has been a mastermind. there are many who feel strongly about this. i do not see policy changing, but there's certainly a feeling in pakistan, the horn of africa, and other places. in yemen, it was the morning after obama's victory that there was a draw on strike in yemen -- drone strike. you can call them a surgical strikes, but there are certainly casualties. it's a conversat
religion and state to celebrate holidays. it is best done on private property. jon property. >> this ends up being about bullies. what iit's about imposing a dynamic that you want to feel as though you belong in a society where you are a minority. and ultimately it's about trying to change the face of the majority to meet you because you can't adapt. i think that this nation is tolerant, and this is about a fully dynamics. >> they are not being bullies, they are asking for the same rights that christian groups had for 50 or 60 years. >> your goal is to push them out. >> tell christian groups to get more aggressive. put in more applications, it's an open process it treats everybody fairly. >> it's not all but,. >> it's not going to be about the dominant religion either. it's about free speech for everybody and freedom for everybody. >> which is brought to you by christianity, by the way. jon: the judge is hearing this case today. we'll see if she comes to some kind of accommodation that makes both sides happy. i don't know it doesn't look good right now. thank you both. jenna: in the meant
was doing on a day-to-day basis. when he was advertising on welfare reform and the war on religion, i think the republican superpacs you're probably thinking what on earth are we doing here? >> so what you're saying is they were -- they need to get better at not coordinating their campaigns? [laughter] >> it's not even a matter of coordination, it's a matter of strategic direction, and the romney campaign never had one. and on the obama side, it was pretty clear his campaign was about the middle class. and every single ad we ran was if mitt romney wins, the middle class loses. so i think there was a much clearer lane for us to swim in than on the romney side. were they supposed to defend against the bain attacks? were today supposed to bet -- get into the welfare reform game? it was unclear. >> look, though, you run a superpac. do you think they're good for america? >> no. i think a system where you can give unlimited contributions and in some cases not disclose who those contributions come from is not something that's particularly a good thing for the country. our view is that even though
discussion of the impact of very strongly developing fundamental movements in the world religions, particularly monotheistic religions, impacting outcomes of democratic elections as well as perhaps creating a certain amount of instability in terms of governance models that we face. i would be very interested in the panel's assessment of the impact of fundamentalist religious movements, particularly in the context of what is going to be a new normal. >> let's get one more in here. >> i think what is so interesting about this discussion is the baseline question, just putting the question of the new normal in the context of america and american power and leadership. how powerful did america look in 1979 up to vietnam? not very. how powerful did america look in 1989, 10 years later? extremely powerful. 1999, in vincible. 2009-now? well, we have settled down, but we do not really know what we have settled down into. i think it is a baseline question, and i think we forget how quickly the perception of the strings -- strength of american leadership can be. what i think is the question a
fundamental movements and various world religions, particularly monotheistic religions. impacting outcomes of democratic elections as well as, perhaps, creating certain amount of instability in terms of governance models that we face. i would be very interested in the panel's assessment. the impact of a fundamentalist religious movements in and particularly in the context of what is going to be in a normal. >> let's get one more in here. >> get a my cure. you can just use this. >> i want to check with you. >> speak louder. >> can you hear me? okay. here. >> that would have been too much. so interesting about this discussion, raised by all three participants, if you like the baseline question, and just putting the question of the new normal in the context of america to my american power in, a decade basis, and i was jotting down how powerful america looks in 1979 after vietnam, that are on hostage crisis, not very. how powerful in 1989? just ten years later to major in the powerful. how about 1999? select essentially invisible @booktv vincible. 2009. well, we settle down, but we don't reall
for help. our religion correspondent, lauren green, is live with this story. >> hi, jenna. as you said,ouses of worship are supposed to be sanctuaries for the broken hearted, but countless are in great need of healing themselves. the repair work as begun at all saints in bayhead, new jersey, but the road ahead is wrong. the historic structure was built in the late 1800s and designed by boat builders but was never meant to withstand the surge from dirty bay water that sandy brought. >> if it had been just the ocean water, it would have been a lot cleaner, but because it was the bay water and the ditch, it threw the mud in as well and caused more damage than if it had been just purely clean sea water. >> reporter: now, sandy was an equal opportunity destroyer. at western synagogue in queens, new york, the rabbi surveys the damage. the storm put the entire neighborhood and temple under at least four feet of water. the once-pristine sanctuary now has buckling floors, the holy books are unusable, but because of their religious content they cannot be burned, so they sit covered outdoors awai
think that people have a right to not practice religion here. they have a right to do things the way they feel comfortable doing it, which is called secular or religious thinking. they have the right in this country not to follow religious law. for him to feel that he needed to resign over a scandal, i do not think that is proper when he does not have to follow religious thinking about sex in this country. host: thank you for the call this morning. here is the editorial from "usa today." host: diane, want to get your thoughts this morning on the democratic line. caller: i went to school with one of my friends in coronado, california. wondering if you are related to anyone from connecticut. host: not sure. what are your thoughts about the general's resignation? caller: let me tell you something, we came here when i was a, we came to a military base. my stepfather served in the first marines. also we went to camp pendleton and he was the commander of that unit for many years. at the veterans day to our veterans. living and deceased. and active, i should say. about the general, were we
'll really have to think a lot about, is that religious religion, or is it really deep and historical sense of oneness? my own little theory is that it became until recently, people like strom thurmond, the fact that so many white men, historically in this country pulled themselves that they were not the product of race and so this invisibility of the product of race is not the product of the women who must've really wanted them. otherwise it is -- it is very clear that some parts operate at a distance. >> i would also, speaking to your question about whether this is about action or reaction, and of course, i think it is all part of this so that everything is constant in action and reaction -- one thing i want to point to, i think when we talk about these kind of race comments on the contraceptive comments are so outrageous over the past year, we think of it as a republican blood of stupidity. in fact, one of the interesting things is that it was prompted by unusual behavior on the part of the democrats. the democrats, while being the party of women, and about the time -- as soon as they st
respect to religion because i know that you're a very religious person and do you feel that god has a plan for you. >> yes. the gentleman who ran against me was told by god -- and people would say well, you know, you're theologically trained, you can probably slice him to pieces. my response was any time anybody says they were told by god to do something, i leave it alone. you know. i would say that sometimes the voice of god we hear is our own voice in disguise. and so i'm -- but at the same time i'm careful about saying well, why would god talk to you? you only have a bachelor's degree or you only -- and it was in geography. but i think we leave that alone. now i don't think that we have to manufacture a god discussion and i became really angry with many democrats saying we've got to start talking about god. my response is god will not be pimped. are we going to talk about him so we can impress some people who believe that -- say the word "god." called the name "god." i can't do that. i think in the course of who we are
and really not about race or religion. and that is a difficult concept for some others as they look at our society, net and don't necessarily fully understand it. >> i'm a sponsor with northrop-grumman. i am curious because i lived in syria, to go back to syria, when there is a lot of discussion about things breaking down into sectarianism, i don't see any mention of the fact that syria has probably the largest christian population in the middle middle east, something like 20 to 30%. [inaudible] >> my figures are dated. anyway i am curious, if you would comment on the role of the christian community in syria and how you see that playing out? thank you. >> john -- jen'nan. >> we aren't hearing a lot about the difference between the muslims and christians because it's not an overarching and pressing problem in syria and getting back to comment earlier about the rest of the region, my half brother who was with the libyan rebels against gadhafi, they are now all trying to help the turks get assad out so getting back to marc's comment, we have gone a long way to at least getting some of the res
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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